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Author Topic: How the upsets happened  (Read 1105 times)
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deck
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« on: April 20, 2011, 10:41:52 AM »

http://www.fightnews.com/Boxing/how-the-upsets-happened-82061

How the upsets happened


By Graham Houston

The upsets keep coming and we had two of them on Saturday night, with Orlando Salido hammering Juan Manuel Lopez on Showtime while HBO had Victor Ortiz pounding out a well-earned decision over Andre Berto. Both were rousing fights that will surely figure in the year’s-best roundup.

It is fights such as this that make boxing the great sport that it is, and, for me, no other sport comes close. Salido and Ortiz came into the ring in tremendous condition and seized the moment. Both men had a winner’s mindset: they weren’t going to let anything stop them.

Ortiz showed that he is truly a real fighter when he survived two knockdowns to defeat Berto in their welterweight title fight. Moving up from 140 pounds made a world of difference for Ortiz, who looked very strong at the weight and had the confidence in his stamina to fight hard in every round.

This wasn’t the Ortiz who danced away from Nate Campbell and virtually bailed out of the fight after almost stopping Lamont Peterson.

We can attribute Ortiz’s capitulation against Marcos Maidana in part to a lack of ring maturity, in part common sense. Ortiz was badly swollen under one eye, cut over the other, and hurt more than he had ever been hurt, and he saw no sense in continuing.

It is not unknown for fighters to give up when they feel they are at risk of lasting damage. They didn’t come much tougher or gamer than George Chuvalo, for example, and yet the Canadian heavyweight iron man waved a glove in surrender after Joe Frazier’s left hook had cracked an eye socket.

Ortiz’s safety-first style in the Campbell and Peterson fights concerned me because Ortiz seemed a bit too concerned about avoiding contact. The mental part of boxing is hugely important, though. Ortiz might have decided to try a stylish, hit-and-move strategy in these fights and, after being stung by criticism, simply decided to go back to the power-and-pressure style that made him such an exciting prospect early in his career. On Saturday night, Ortiz even looked tougher with his stubble of a beard.

The featherweight title fight in Puerto Rico was another thriller, with Salido taking the best that Lopez could throw at him and coming on to blast the betting favourite with big right hands. The intervention in the eighth round by referee Roberto Ramirez Jr. looked mildly controversial but I had no argument — Lopez was getting hit too hard, too often.

Salido looked very strong, a veritable powerhouse. This tough Mexican veteran isn’t fast or flashy but he flat out knows how to fight. Salido crowded Lopez but kept his chin tucked in when he threw his big hooks and right hands. Lopez, standing straight up as he fired heavy shots from his southpaw stance, was always at risk of getting caught by flush, heavy blows. He would have been smart to go to a boxing, moving style after getting rocked in the fourth round, but that isn’t JuanMa’s way. Lopez will stand and trade, and rely on his punching power to have the last word. It worked when he got off the floor to knock out Bernabe Concepcion and again when he outlasted Rafael Marquez. This time, though, the immovable object triumphed over the irresistible force. Each man could hurt the other, but Salido had the far better chin.

Lopez does have the ability to box: he wasn’t always an out-and-out banger. I looked back at my notes on Lopez’s fight with Cuauhtemoc Vargas that took place on ShoBox four years ago and was reminded that Lopez “boxed beautifully”. As I noted at the time, Lopez was “relaxed” and “made it look easy”. A string of exciting knockout wins saw Lopez fall in love with his own punching power, however. He hits very hard, but when Salido wouldn’t go away, Lopez was in trouble, locked into a launch-all-missiles type of fight in which his lack of defence, inability to change tactics — and Salido’s durability — conspired to bring about his unexpected downfall.
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« on: April 20, 2011, 10:41:52 AM »

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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2011, 10:46:30 AM »

thanks, deck! good read
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2011, 12:23:43 PM »

Good stuff Deck.

Although the bookies had Berto a big favourite, that was based on ignorance and a lack of knowledge. Everyone who knew the sport well saw it as a pickem fight.
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2011, 12:39:34 AM »

Thanks Deck.

Another upset occured Tuesday when 39 year old Muhammad Rachman won the WBA 105 title beating Sithmorseng in Bangkok. I know it's not big news, but it was certainly another upset to add to this run we've been seeing of late. Not too many 39 year olds fighting at straw weight and not too many 39 year old champs period. Congratulations to this little, old man.

http://www.boxingscene.com/rachman-stops-sithmorseng-grabs-wba-ttle--38272
By Osman Ratero
Bangkok, Thailand - Muhammad Rachman (64-10-5, 33KOs) is once again a champion after stopping previously undefeated Kwanthai Sithmorseng (31-1-1, 17KOs) in nine rounds to win the WBA's minimumweight title. The champion was the early winner with vicious punches that sent Rachman down in the second, but he made it up and came back in the later rounds to drop Sithmorseng down twice in the ninth, with the now ex-champion staying down for the full count.

The win is a huge one for Rachman, who was 1-4 coming into this fight and was knocked out for the first time last September. He only had one win since June of 2008. Rachman was the IBF's champion until he lost the title to Florante Condes in 2007.

"It's a bitter disappointment to lose this fight as I felt I took control in the opening part. However, I made a mistake in space of a second. I don't feel disheartened by the loss. I will take a break then return to training to try and reclaim the title," said Kwanthai.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2011, 12:48:26 AM by brocktonbomber » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2011, 12:43:14 AM »

definitely a good read Deck! IQ my friend
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2011, 12:43:14 AM »

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