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Author Topic: COTTOS LAST FIGHT TONIGHT  (Read 1332 times)
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dmp
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« on: December 02, 2017, 09:01:18 PM »

anyone staying up for it.
below is a link for HBOs cotto a retrospective



http://www.boxnation.com/boxing-news/watch-miguel-cotto-a-retrospective-hbo-documentary/
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« on: December 02, 2017, 09:01:18 PM »

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Gaz
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2017, 09:58:50 AM »

I watched it. Cotto demonstrated all the symptoms of a fighter gone on one fight too long, and it was almost like the ideal defeat to bow out with in a way. He was shown how far he's slipped from his peak but hasn't taken too much damage during the fight for it to have a lasting effect on him physically beyond this point. At the end of the day though, his reflexes and ability to pull the trigger clearly weren't what they used to be, he was rocked a number of times and he lost a close ish but clear decision to a guy he would have chewed up in his prime. That's the ideal way to realise that this game isn't for you anymore, definitely not at the top level anyway so it's a fantastic call by Cotto to call it quits now.

Fantastic fighter, one of my all time favourites if not the number one (that's favourite, not necessarily the best) in my lifetime of watching the sport. The first fight I saw of his was Ricardo Torres, which pretty much tells you all you need to know about how much you could be on the edge of your seat watching the guy. It's a shame that the interest in him has gradually lessened over the last 3 or 4 years given everything he's contributed to boxing, but at the end of the day he can walk away with history on his side as Puerto Rico's first 4-weight world champ, he's been in with everybody and been a significant attraction for a large portion of his career, so he can definitely walk away happy with his lot.

It's been a privilege to watch him, just a shame the opportunity never came to be at the arena for one of his fights.

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jimjack
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« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2017, 10:49:46 AM »

A few too many fights... proper legend though.
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jaff_no1
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« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2017, 10:58:43 AM »

Should have packed up after the trout loss. The few fights after this have done nothing for his career. The Martinez victory was clearly tainted due to Sergio being in such poor shape

After last night and Hopkins previously, is it dangerous for fighters to take a perceived easy last fight?
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Bonters
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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2017, 12:41:39 PM »

I watched it. Cotto demonstrated all the symptoms of a fighter gone on one fight too long, and it was almost like the ideal defeat to bow out with in a way. He was shown how far he's slipped from his peak but hasn't taken too much damage during the fight for it to have a lasting effect on him physically beyond this point. At the end of the day though, his reflexes and ability to pull the trigger clearly weren't what they used to be, he was rocked a number of times and he lost a close ish but clear decision to a guy he would have chewed up in his prime. That's the ideal way to realise that this game isn't for you anymore, definitely not at the top level anyway so it's a fantastic call by Cotto to call it quits now.

Fantastic fighter, one of my all time favourites if not the number one (that's favourite, not necessarily the best) in my lifetime of watching the sport. The first fight I saw of his was Ricardo Torres, which pretty much tells you all you need to know about how much you could be on the edge of your seat watching the guy. It's a shame that the interest in him has gradually lessened over the last 3 or 4 years given everything he's contributed to boxing, but at the end of the day he can walk away with history on his side as Puerto Rico's first 4-weight world champ, he's been in with everybody and been a significant attraction for a large portion of his career, so he can definitely walk away happy with his lot.

It's been a privilege to watch him, just a shame the opportunity never came to be at the arena for one of his fights.



Great post!
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LiveFight
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2017, 12:41:39 PM »

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unknown
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« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2017, 02:20:11 PM »

Martinez victory was clearly tainted due to Sergio being in such poor shape


disagree with that, he took Martinez who up to that point on his bike was schooling every one else, and he beat him tidily.

I don't remember seeing Martinez out of shape, he tried hard but cotto just had his number tools and skill to take him out,

it was a good fight I was surprised by how good cotto was that night..

no?
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The Hurricane
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2017, 02:27:05 PM »

Did you miss the fact that Martinez only had one leg working for almost the entire fight?
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Gaz
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« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2017, 04:36:01 PM »

Martinez was pretty much F***ed before the fight started in all fairness but he was in decent enough shape to last 10 rounds. Can't agree that the Trout loss should have been the end for him though. He's generally operated pretty well since that loss even if his wins since then have been at a slightly lower level. Rodriguez, Geale, Kamegai all decent enough wins and he gave Canelo a far closer run than the scorecards suggested. I think the back end of his career has been alright although it's been obvious his profile has dipped in the last couple of years. I don't think last night was a sellout by any means, whereas a peak Cotto would have packed out that arena last night.
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lurkyshaka
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« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2017, 05:23:49 PM »

Liam Smith will be licking his chops at the prospect of getting his hands on Ali......

Even against a clearly faded fighter, he was still behind until Cotto tore the bicep tendon. I don't begrudge Ali his title win, but I think he's been flattered by it. I don't think he's all that good. Not quite a sitting duck titlist, but certainly a vulnerable one. I think Smith will be able to get at him and expose the fragility.
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Faulks
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« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2017, 11:38:27 AM »

Martinez was pretty much F***ed before the fight started in all fairness but he was in decent enough shape to last 10 rounds. Can't agree that the Trout loss should have been the end for him though. He's generally operated pretty well since that loss even if his wins since then have been at a slightly lower level. Rodriguez, Geale, Kamegai all decent enough wins and he gave Canelo a far closer run than the scorecards suggested. I think the back end of his career has been alright although it's been obvious his profile has dipped in the last couple of years. I don't think last night was a sellout by any means, whereas a peak Cotto would have packed out that arena last night.

Think your over estimating there.

Do you have stats to back the packed out but?

I don't think he sold it out automatically
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wbamitch
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« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2017, 06:45:16 PM »

Unfortunate the way it ended, I didnít see the Kamegai fight for any signs and the fight before that he ran Canelo very close, so only very recently he still had a lot to offer the sport. He seemed off very early and of course getting hurt a few times he really had to focus on his recovery which meant he didnít get going at all for a while. Surprisingly Ali had the power advantage and had this presence that he could put Cotto on the back foot at any time.
Cotto had a resurgence in the middle rounds but Ali comfortably took the last few to seal the fight, Ali lacked a bit of killer instinct against what did very much look like a shell of a fighter, I donít really like to use the word shot.
Khan and Brook may be looking at Ali as a great shot of a title at 154.
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dmp
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« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2017, 08:51:53 PM »

Cotto was ruined by the cheating bastard
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lurkyshaka
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« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 09:28:34 PM »

Cotto was ruined by the cheating bastard

I wouldn't go that far....he enjoyed plenty of success after that fight. Didn't seem to change him in either his mindset or physicality. Still seemed the same fighter he'd always been.
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bigbibbs
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« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2017, 03:28:15 PM »

I expected an easy last night for him but this was terrible.

But in another way I think he knows in six months or a year he's finished. If he had got a blow out win there would always be that chance he would think just one more.
 
A win would have been great against a fighter who five years ago wouldn't have lasted to long
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ChicagoFightFan
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« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2017, 07:58:15 AM »

I watched it. Cotto demonstrated all the symptoms of a fighter gone on one fight too long, and it was almost like the ideal defeat to bow out with in a way. He was shown how far he's slipped from his peak but hasn't taken too much damage during the fight for it to have a lasting effect on him physically beyond this point. At the end of the day though, his reflexes and ability to pull the trigger clearly weren't what they used to be, he was rocked a number of times and he lost a close ish but clear decision to a guy he would have chewed up in his prime. That's the ideal way to realise that this game isn't for you anymore, definitely not at the top level anyway so it's a fantastic call by Cotto to call it quits now.

Fantastic fighter, one of my all time favourites if not the number one (that's favourite, not necessarily the best) in my lifetime of watching the sport. The first fight I saw of his was Ricardo Torres, which pretty much tells you all you need to know about how much you could be on the edge of your seat watching the guy. It's a shame that the interest in him has gradually lessened over the last 3 or 4 years given everything he's contributed to boxing, but at the end of the day he can walk away with history on his side as Puerto Rico's first 4-weight world champ, he's been in with everybody and been a significant attraction for a large portion of his career, so he can definitely walk away happy with his lot.

It's been a privilege to watch him, just a shame the opportunity never came to be at the arena for one of his fights.



Like your post. Disagree with the majority of the content in terms of Cotto slipping in the very end of his career, but I do relate to your admiration and respect for a favorite fighter.

I would argue that what you consider to be a shattered form happened way ... way ... way before this last fight. New York Puerto Ricans sort of always kept him relevant. Fun fighter, but he was far from a legend after he left light welterweight. The narration by the boxing media has always pissed me off. "Margarito ended him with gloves made of metal". No one ever mentions the fact that Margarito lost to Paul Williams - handily. Let alone the fact that there is no proof that Cotto lost because of plaster wraps. His face looked doubly F***ed up after losing to Manny Pacquaio.

With that said, I still appreciate a well supported -- or clarified -- post in boxing debate.

For me, Cotto always reminds me of -- Paul Williams  and Sergio Martinez-- fighters that I feel were slighted. One beat the man that beat an early Cotto under the same circumstances that were said to have been impossible. The other had a fight when he could barely stand because of injuries. Martinez never copped to the injuries -- possibly because of contractual reasons -- and is barely a mention on the boxing radar. Yet, I think that he would have danced circles around Cotto years before.

Cotto had his place in boxing history, but his most notable portions of his career will do nothing more than remind me of ht hypocrisy of the boxing business.


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